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Research Archive

Scholars Bookshop hosts discussion and book signing April 9

BOONE—The Scholars Bookshop in the University Bookstore at Appalachian State University will host Patricia D. Beaver and Sandra L. Ballard Wednesday, April 9, at 3:30 p.m. for a discussion and signing of their book “Voices From the Headwaters: Stories From Meat Camp, Tamarack (Pottertown) & Sutherland, North Carolina.” The work is the latest publication from the university’s Center for Appalachian Studies.

Appalachian astronomer helps discover asteroid’s ring system

BOONE—Happenstance led to the discovery of the first ring system around an asteroid, and Appalachian State University Professor Joseph Pollock was part of the team of astronomers that made the discovery.

Batchelor receives NYC’s Explorer’s Club grant

BOONE—Cameron Batchelor of Raleigh, a junior geology major at Appalachian State University, has been awarded a $2,000 Youth Activity Grant from the Explorer’s Club in New York City to conduct fieldwork in Mongolia this summer.

Celebration of Student Research and Creative Endeavors to be held April 10

BOONE—The 17th Annual Celebration of Student Research and Creative Endeavors will be held at Appalachian State University Thursday, April 10, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the fourth floor of Plemmons Student Union. The public is invited.

Environmental Humanities Symposium held April 4 at Appalachian

BOONE—An Environmental Humanities Symposium will be held Friday, April 4, at Appalachian State University in Plemmons Student Union’s Price Lake Room.

Walker College of Business team wins CFA Institute Research Challenge

BOONE—Five students from Appalachian State University’s Walker College of Business have won the N.C. CFA Institute Research Challenge, besting student teams from Elon University, N.C. State University and UNC Wilmington.

Book addresses new business approach for competitive edge

BOONE—A combined emphasis on manufacturing efficiency and customer service is needed by business managers in today’s rapidly changing business environment.

Anthropologist works with Guatemalan leaders to preserve a town’s history and culture

BOONE—Timothy J. Smith, an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at Appalachian State University, has developed a special relationship during the past 17 years with the predominantly indigenous town of Sololá, Guatemala.

Professor’s book details history of cybercrime and provides case studies

BOONE—Cybercrime, criminal activity conducted over a computer network or the Internet, has grown in frequency and sophistication since the 1950s when a group of college students began breaching computers to steal information. While their original intent seemingly was benign, a range of theft using computer technology soon followed.