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Research Archive

Appalachian Innovation Scholars Program applications due Jan. 23, faculty and staff eligible to apply

By Elisabeth Wall

BOONE, N.C.—Heads up, Appalachian State University faculty and staff. Are you conducting innovative research? Working creatively to solve problems, create lasting institutional change or benefit the community? Do you have an idea that promotes sustainability in the areas of economics, equity and the environment?

Appalachian students a major presence during the 12th Annual State of North Carolina Undergraduate Research and Creativity Symposium

By University Communications

BOONE, N.C.—Appalachian State University encourages undergraduate research, and the university’s representation at the 12th Annual State of North Carolina Undergraduate Research and Creativity Symposium (SNCURCS) at N.C. Central University in Durham last November is testimony to that fact. According to information supplied by the Office of Student Research (OSR), Appalachian and N.C. State University hosted the largest number of undergraduate research presentations at the symposium – 60 each.

Appalachian assistant professor Alice P. Wright recognized by archaeology association, leads collaborative, interdisciplinary research team

By Elisabeth Wall

BOONE, N.C.—“Being named one of two of the most promising young scholars in your field is very humbling,” Alice P. Wright, assistant professor of archaeology in the Department of Anthropology at Appalachian State University, said. “Now I have to prove them right.”

Wright, who is 30 years old, was presented the C.B. Moore Award for “Excellence in Southeastern Archaeology or associated studies by a younger scholar” at the October 2016 Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Archaeological Conference.

Appalachian State University wins National Science Foundation award for state-of-the-art microscope

By University Communications

BOONE, N.C.—Appalachian State University’s William C. and Ruth Ann Dewel Microscopy Facility has received a $430,900 award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to purchase a new state-of-the-art laser scanning confocal microscope (LSM).

Environmental science major Tara Early creates prize-winning research poster, is honored by SETAC

By Ken Keuffel

BOONE, N.C.—Tara Early of Morehead City just graduated from Appalachian State University with a Bachelor of Science degree in environmental science. She is now applying to graduate schools, and her experiences as a researcher at Appalachian have helped make her a strong candidate for some of the best doctoral-level toxicology labs and programs in the country.

‘Celebration of Innovation’ showcases new Appalachian College of Fine and Applied Arts’ campus/community space

By Elisabeth Wall

BOONE – Appalachian State University, along with the College of Fine and Applied Arts, has leased space at 182 Howard St., across from Boone eatery The Local, that will serve as a campus-wide collaborative, interdisciplinary work and meeting space. The first project is the actual redesign of the facility by a team of Integrative Design Experience (IDEX) laboratory students.

Dr. Zach Throckmorton of Lincoln Memorial University to lecture on Homo naledi Nov. 9 in I.G. Greer Auditorium at Appalachian State University

By University Communications

BOONE—Dr. Zach Throckmorton will deliver a lecture titled “Meet Homo naledi” at 5 p.m. Nov. 9 in I.G. Greer Auditorium at Appalachian State University. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Faculty, student researchers at Appalachian State University and UNC Asheville research threatened plant species

By University Communications

BOONE and ASHEVILLE—Professors and student researchers from Appalachian State University’s and UNC Asheville’s Departments of Biology have partnered in a federally funded project to assess several aspects of an imperiled plant in western parts of North Carolina and Virginia.

Appalachian State University geologist’s research on ancient footprints garners worldwide attention, will shed light on the roots of our origin

By Elisabeth Wall

BOONE—The spotlight is on Dr. Cynthia Liutkus-Pierce. Big time.

Her recently published research around the age and formation of the largest assemblage of Homo sapiens footprints discovered to date, in the shadow of the Ol Doinyo L’engai volcano in Tanzania, led to an Oct.10 article in National Geographic