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Research Archive

Slow recovery after running? New research shows why and what to do about it

By Jennifer Woodford

KANNAPOLIS—David Nieman, DrPH, with the Appalachian State University Human Performance Lab on the NC Research Campus (NCRC) in Kannapolis, gets a steady stream of emails from runners who find themselves unable to recover from intense exercise like marathons after years of training and competing.

Students participate in the 11th Annual SNCURCS research event

BOONE—A total of 146 undergraduate students and faculty from Appalachian State University attended the 11th Annual State of North Carolina Undergraduate Research and Creativity Symposium at High Point University Nov. 14.

Student shares love of dinosaurs

BOONE—Senior geology major Haviv Avrahami was a winner on two counts at the recent 75th annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology held in Dallas.

Campus community invited to test educational computer game

Faculty and students in the Department of Computer Science at Appalachian State University have developed an educational, Kinect-based computer game and are seeking campus volunteers to try it out.

Appalachian’s SDAP program receives federal funds to help students thrive

BOONE—Ask any college student about their goals and the most likely response is finding a good job and supporting themselves after graduation.

Students with intellectual disabilities are no different.

X-rays uncover gut of 320-million-year-old animal

BRISTOL, ENGLAND—The inner workings of a tiny fossil have been studied using X-ray microscopy, revealing evidence of its digestive system for the first time.

Researchers from the University of Bristol in England, Appalachian State University, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and the Paul Scherrer Institute analyzed the unique fossil specimen using high-energy X-rays at the Swiss Light Source in Switzerland.

Professor joins project to help veterans become farmers

BOONE—Helping former soldiers transition to farming to help meet the nation’s food system needs is a goal of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Appalachian State University is part of that effort.

Appalachian professor studies the interactions between plants and pollinators

BOONE—Worker bumble bees only live a couple of weeks, but it’s that short life span that has enabled researchers to identify changes that are occurring to the species because of climate change in Colorado’s Pennsylvania Mountain Natural Area’s flower diversity.

Appalachian student/faculty delegation presents at conference in Romania

BOONE—A delegation from the Center for Appalachian Studies at Appalachian State University traveled to Brasov, Romania, recently to present research at the Appalachians/Carpathians: Researching, Documenting, and Preserving Highland Traditions conference. Held at Transylvania University of Braşov, the conference brought together a group of international scholars to discuss sustainable development in global mountain regions.