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Research Archive

Appalachian researcher helps link oxygen increase to biodiversity growth

By Chuck Finder and Mary Giunca

BOONE, N.C.—Oxygen has provided a breath of fresh air to the study of the Earth’s evolution some 400-plus million years ago.

A team of researchers, including a faculty member at Appalachian State University, found that oxygen levels appear to increase at about the same time as a three-fold increase in biodiversity during the Ordovician Period, between 445 and 485 million years ago, according to a study published Nov. 20 in Nature Geoscience, a periodical that covers all aspects of the Earth sciences.

Geography major finds adventure and stories in the field

By Mary Giunca

BOONE, N.C.—Digging a snowpit, setting up tents or strapping bags on horses high in the Andes is a long way from day-to-day life in Greensboro. For Evan Montpellier, who loves science and working with his hands, fieldwork for Appalachian State University’s Master of Arts in Geography pointed the way to a fulfilling course of study.

Appalachian Children’s Literature Symposium scheduled for Oct. 28

By Lynn Patterson

BOONE, N.C.—The fourth biennial Children’s Literature Symposium will be held from 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 28, in the Reich College of Education at Appalachian State University. Poet and author Allan Wolf, authors Alan Gratz and Heather Bouwman and storyteller Donna Washington will present approaches for using literature to facilitate reading, creative writing and storytelling in educational settings.

Black Mountain College Semester at Appalachian to include lectures, workshops, art, films and other events

By Mary Anne Redding

BOONE, N.C.—For Appalachian State University’s Black Mountain College (BMC) Semester in spring 2018, multiple departments across the university are collaborating with area museums and other venues to host exhibits, lectures and workshops that will highlight the importance of BMC’s influence within the Appalachian region’s creative, educational and political movements.

Researchers link western wildfire activity to arctic warming

By Peter Soulé

BOONE, N.C.—Are the devastating wildfires in California potentially linked to larger atmospheric processes related to human-caused climate change? Researchers at Appalachian State University and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro believe there might be a connection.

Appalachian’s Team Sunergy travels to World Solar Challenge in Australia to advise Chilean team

By Elisabeth Wall

BOONE, N.C.—Appalachian State University’s Team Sunergy is in Australia, assisting Chilean solar vehicle Team Antakari as its races nearly 2,000 miles from Darwin to Adelaide, Australia for the 2017 Bridgestone World Solar Challenge (BWSC).

Appalachian’s NSF-funded scanning electron microscope supports undergraduate research

By Ellen Gwin Burnette

BOONE, N.C.—The National Science Foundation, through a major research instrumentation program grant, awarded the College of Arts and Sciences’ Dewel Microscopy Facility at Appalachian State University $562,842 for a new scanning electron microscope (SEM).

Appalachian’s Humanities Council Symposium ‘Sustaining Democracy: Existence, Persistence, Resistance’ Sept. 29

By Ellen Gwin Burnette

BOONE, N.C.—The Humanities Council under the College of Arts and Sciences at Appalachian State University will present a symposium titled “Sustaining Democracy: Existence, Persistence, Resistance” from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m., Friday, Sept. 29, in the Blue Ridge Ballroom of Appalachian’s Plemmons Student Union. Admission is free and the event is open to the community.

English major presents at American Literature Association

By Ellen Gwin Burnette

BOONE, N.C.—In May, Appalachian State University’s Tommy Young was one of a handful of undergraduates to present at the American Literature Association Conference, in Boston, Massachusetts. As a member of the Gertrude Stein Society, the English major was one of four scholars to present a paper on a panel titled “New Directions in Stein Studies.”