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Geology Archive

Grains of sand hold clues to the history of Alaska’s glaciers

BOONE—Show most people a core sample from the ocean floor and they only see mud. Ellen Cowan sees a ribbon of time dating back 1 million years or more.

Since 2013, Cowan, a geology professor at Appalachian State University, has been part of an international team of scientists studying climate change and earth systems in the Gulf of Alaska. Their work with the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program is supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

Student shares love of dinosaurs

BOONE—Senior geology major Haviv Avrahami was a winner on two counts at the recent 75th annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology held in Dallas.

X-rays uncover gut of 320-million-year-old animal

BRISTOL, ENGLAND—The inner workings of a tiny fossil have been studied using X-ray microscopy, revealing evidence of its digestive system for the first time.

Researchers from the University of Bristol in England, Appalachian State University, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and the Paul Scherrer Institute analyzed the unique fossil specimen using high-energy X-rays at the Swiss Light Source in Switzerland.

Professors at Appalachian receive NSF grant to study dome formation in Georgia and Western North Carolina

BOONE—The Tallulah Gorge area in Georgia and Toxaway Falls in Gorges State Park in Western North Carolina are well known for their beauty and outdoor recreational offerings.

For Appalachian State University geologists Gabe Casale and Jamie Levine, the areas are also rich in geological information.

Professors’ paper on urban stream restoration receives 2015 Boggess Award

BOONE—A research paper on urban stream restoration written by Assistant Professor Kristan Cockerill and Professor Bill Anderson from Appalachian State University has received the 2015 Boggess Award for the best paper published in 2014 in the Journal of the American Water Resources Association.

Students and geology professor research ancient marine animal

BOONE—Lyndsie White is a senior industrial design major at Appalachian State University. Bonnie Nguyen is a recent graduate of the university’s exercise science program.

Fossils from a new aetosaur species discovered in North Carolina

BOONE—Some 230 million years ago, a distant relative of the crocodile called an aetosaur roamed prehistoric Earth. Aetosaurs were about three to 15 feet long and covered head to toe with bony plates that served as a type of body armor. A series of recently discovered armor plates from North Carolina are distinct from any others previously discovered.

Perfect lawns aren’t perfect for the environment, research shows

BOONE—The continued quest for the perfect lawn contributes to global warming.

Heinen receives NOAA Hollings Scholarship

BOONE—Laura Heinen’s passion for environmental research has garnered attention from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The sophomore geology major at Appalachian State University has received a NOAA Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship for the 2014-15 academic year.