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UNC President Spellings and new members of the UNC Board of Governors visit Appalachian campus Sept. 22

By Elisabeth Wall

BOONE, N.C.—As part of their continuing tour of the University of North Carolina system’s 17 campuses, the five new members of the UNC Board of Governors spent Friday afternoon, Sept. 22, touring Appalachian State University.

Board members toured key areas of development for the university. Stops included the new Beaver College of Health Sciences building, the first Connect NC Bond-funded construction project underway; the old Watauga High School property, which the university has arranged to purchase from Watauga County; and the former site of the Broyhill Inn and Conference Center, which will house the university’s new Innovation Campus.

Students and faculty also shared research projects and key university initiatives promoting student employment, wellness, and community outreach and engagement.

The board members also visited UNC-Charlotte and Western Carolina University on this leg of their tour, Sept. 21-22.

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With Appalachian State University’s iconic wind turbine in the background, UNC System President Margaret Spellings, third from left, gathers with members of the UNC Board of Governors and Appalachian representatives on land designated as the Broyhill Innovation District, one-time location of the Broyhill Inn and Conference Center. Options for developing the 77-acre site include new academic, research and laboratory spaces, living laboratory gardens and a biological preserve. Pictured from left are Robert Rucho, Philip Byers, Spellings, Carolyn Coward, Appalachian’s Chancellor Sheri N. Everts, Appalachian senior Tyler Hardin of Greensboro who serves as president of the University of North Carolina Association of Student Governments (NCASG), Wendy Murphy and Randall Ramsey. Photo by Marie Freeman
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UNC System President Margaret Spellings, left, and Chancellor Sheri N. Everts sign a UNC System Strategic Plan Metrics pact, which commits Appalachian and the system’s other signing institutions in efforts to increase enrollment and achievement for low-income and rural students and to support critical workforce programs such as health care, STEM and teacher education. Photo by Marie Freeman
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UNC Board of Governors member Randall Ramsey, left, engages with Appalachian senior Jordan Boles of High Point about her State Employees Credit Union (SECU)-funded internship, one of many programs directed by Student Affairs. In the background from left, Sharon Jenson, associate director of Appalachian’s Career Development Center, and senior Khedema Robert of Charlotte, also a recipient of the SECU student intern scholarship. Photo by Marie Freeman
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Since 2010, Appalachian consistently has been named a Military Friendly® School by Victory Media. Coordinator of Student Veteran Services Eric Gormly, right, speaks to Tyler Hardin, Appalachian senior and president of the University of North Carolina Association of Student Governments (NCASG). Looking on are veteran and graduate student Phil Weiner of Chapel Hill, to Gormly’s immediate right, and junior Anthony Corso of Savannah, Georgia, president of the Student Veterans Association. Photo by Marie Freeman
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More than $15 billion in U.S. agricultural production depends on honey bees. Luke Craig of Boone, right, a graduate student in computer science, explains Appalachian’s BeeMon system to UNC Board of Governors member Robert Rucho. A product of the Visual and Image Processing Lab in the Department of Computer Science, BeeMon allows beekeepers to observe their hives and provide significant data to researchers in the field. Using predictive and prescriptive analytics to study practices and outcomes in beekeeping, data scientists can develop best management practices for beekeepers and growers of pollinated crops. Photo by Marie Freeman