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Science activities, demonstrations and stargazing sessions offered Sept. 11-25 at Appalachian

science_t.jpgBOONE—Appalachian State University is participating in the N.C. Science Festival, a statewide series of events highlighting science, Sept. 11-25 on campus.

“This is a multi-disciplinary, multi-institution outreach effort to get the public excited and informed about science,” said Tonya Coffey, an assistant professor in Appalachian’s Department of Physics and Astronomy and coordinator of the campus event.

Science festival activities begin Sept. 11 with stargazing at Appalachian’s Dark Sky Observatory.  Other activities include a Science Expo, seminars on forensics and misconceptions about science, physics and chemistry demo shows, and lunar viewings at Rankin Observatory. The activities are free and will be suitable for public school audiences as well as adults. For more information about Science Festival activities, visit www.ncsciencefestival.org.

Appalachian’s Science Festival activities also are on Facebook under “Boone NC Science Festival Events.”

Parking is free on campus after 5 p.m. Parking decks are located on Rivers Street and College Street. For additional parking information or a map, visit www.parking.appstate.edu or call the university’s Parking and Traffic Office at 828- 262-2878.

Science festival activities at Appalachian are:

Sept. 11, 9 p.m. to midnight – Stargazing at the university’s Dark Sky Observatory. Viewings will include deep sky objects such as star clusters, nebulae and galaxies. Stargazing sessions are free but require registration at www.ncsciencefestival.org. Click on Sept. 11 and scroll down to the 9 p.m. listing.

Sept. 12, 1-5 p.m. – Science Expo in Plemmons Student Union Grandfather Mountain Ballroom. Science outreach booths with demonstrations and hands-on activities. Lab and facility tours will originate from the student union.

Sept. 14, 3 p.m. – Weather balloon release at Bethel Elementary School held in conjunction with a NASA grant and Bethel Science Club activities.

Sept. 14, 6-8 p.m., 105 Walker Hall – “Theories, Laws, Hypotheses, or Facts: What difference does it make in science and why should you care?” presented by biology professor Max Dass. This is the first seminar in a series on misconceptions about science offered throughout the semester.

Sept. 15, 6:30 p.m., Room 112 CAP (Chemistry, Astronomy and Physics Building) – “Forensic Science – It’s Not Like CSI” presented by chemistry professor Libby Puckett. The lecture includes a hands-on demo of DNA extraction and making DNA necklaces with the extracted DNA.

Sept. 17, 6 p.m., Room 307 CAP – Story reading and hands on activity for K-3 children and parents. Children will listen for clues during the reading of an original story titled “Lorna’s Sun Bottle.” After hearing the story, the children will become” the main character and go to the laboratory area where they must manipulate chemicals, observe the color changes, and add substances to the “Sun Bottle” in the correct order based on the story clues in order to release the trapped Sun Spirit in the Kingdom of Alchemy.

Sept. 17 and 18, 9 p.m. – Lunar viewing at Rankin Observatory. Registration is required by visiting www.ncsciencefestival.org. Click on Sept. 17 and 18 and scroll down to the 9 p.m. listing.

Sept. 20, 6:30 p.m., Room 108 CAP – Physics Demonstration Show. Strobe lights, projectors, ping pong balls and an electromagnet will be used to illustrate concepts covered in physics and astronomy classes, including light, sound, mechanic, fluids, electricity and magnetism.

Sept. 22, 8 p.m., Broyhill Inn and Conference Center – David Easterling, chief of the Scientific Services Division at NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, will present the talk “Observed and Projected Climate Change.” His talk is co-sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences and the Office of the Chancellor. Easterling’s research interests include the detection of climate change in the observed record, particularly changes in extreme climate events.

Sept. 23, 4 p.m., AppalAIR site located behind the Broyhill Inn and Conference Center – Ribbon cutting and weather balloon launch.

Sept. 24, 6:30 p.m., Room 112 CAP – Chemistry Demonstration Show

Sept. 25, 9 p.m. to midnight – Stargazing at the university’s Dark Sky Observatory. Viewing will include deep sky objects such as star clusters, nebulae and galaxies. Stargazing sessions are free but require registration at www.ncsciencefestival.org. Click on Sept. 25 and scroll down to the 9 p.m. listing.

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