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Jackson Remembered for Contributions to University and Community

jackson.jpgBOONE–Jim Jackson had an appetite for life.

jackson1.jpgHe was a faculty member in Appalachian State University’s Reich College of Education, once served as the university’s dean of continuing education, helped develop the continuing education center, now known as the Broyhill Inn and Conference Center, and convinced many prospective students and faculty members to come to Appalachian.

Jackson, who died in 1998, was also known for his culinary interests. His graduate-level seminars were as famous for the shared food with students during class as they were for their educational content.

He was such a fixture in the Broyhill Inn’s dining room that the setting has been named in his honor. Plaques recognizing his contributions to Appalachian and the Boone community have been placed in the main dining room, known as the James W. Jackson Dining Room.

“The truest memorial is in the lives of the persons he impacted in so many ways,” said Dr. Harold Wilson, former chair of the Department of Leadership and Educational Studies. “(Jim) continues to live through their lives and accomplishments.” Wilson and others spoke of Jackson’s humanitarianism, accomplishments and impact during a recent ceremony dedicating the dining room in his memory.

Jackson often “held court” in the dining room, according to Chancellor Francis T. Borkowski. “He always had a caring attitude and a genuine concern for others.”

His work to establish Appalachian’s continuing education programs “helped the university change its image from a sleepy college to a dynamic, mainstream comprehensive university,” according to former Chancellor John E. Thomas. “Many visitors got their first impression, and sometimes their only impression, of Appalachian from these surroundings. Jim was a good salesman and a master teacher.”

Jackson first came to Appalachian in 1969 as assistant to Chancellor Herbert Wey. In 1973, he became dean of summer sessions and dean of the college of continuing education, where he stayed until 1983. He later coordinated and directed the higher education graduate programs in the Department of Leadership and Educational Studies.

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Picture Caption: Ken and Doris Jenkins, professors in the Reich College of Education, and university employee Glenda Lynch admire a plaque honoring the late James W. Jackson. Jackson, a professor and former administrator at Appalachian State University, died in 1998. The main dining room at the university’s Broyhill Inn and Conference Center has been named in his memory. (Appalachian photo by University Photographer Mike Rominger)

Second Picture Caption: Kathryn Jackson, left, and Sonny Sweet unveil a plaque honoring the late James W. Jackson. Jackson was a professor in Appalachian State University’s Reich College of Education at the time of his death in 1998. The plaque will be displayed in the Broyhill Inn and Conference Center’s main dining hall, which has been named in Jackson’s honor. Kathryn Jackson, wife of the late Jim Jackson, and Sonny Sweet, one of Jackson’s many friends and fellow Boone Kiwanis Club members, unveil the display. (Appalachian photo by University Photographer Mike Rominger)